Historical inquiry question examples ks1

22. okt. 2019 ... 2) Challenge children to generate questions about the object. What is it? Who used it? What was it for? Who made it? When was it last used? Was ...Andrew Marr analyses 1860s America and the American Civil War, explaining how the conflict, and Abraham Lincoln, changed American history forever. The origins of blues and ragtime Howard Goodall...Oct 12, 2017 · A great inquiry-based question. addresses an authentic problem or issue. is complex and requires multiple levels of analysis. requires the use of primary / secondary sources to answer it. requires the use of historical thinking skills such as sourcing and contextualizing. lends itself to the creation of an argumentative essay or product. rm6000 crown Open-ended questions like those below have no right or wrong answers, but help to broaden children’s thinking processes, to develop their speech and language skills, and to build confidence in their ability to express themselves using words. A new Big Question is posed every week in the Bosbury Telegraph!Article. The recent survey of history teaching in primary schools conducted by the Historical Association revealed that the majority of respondents felt that they were short of resources to teach the revised National Curriculum. Not surprisingly most schools look to find resources that do the job cheaply.An enquiry approach is becoming more popular for teaching many primary curriculum subjects. However, enquiry has always been the backbone of good history teaching. Knowing what constitutes a good historical enquiry and how to build one that will enable your pupils to get better at history is not as easy... Click to view. extra large chest of drawers Excerpt. Historical inquiry is a process of questioning, organising, analysing and explaining events that happened in the past. It is a cyclical process which utilises key inquiry questions. Questions focus on historical sources or evidences. … shaq build 2k23 MUSIC ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS EXAMPLES Creating 1.How do musicians generate creative ideas? 2. How do musicians make creative decisions? 3. How do musicians improve the quality of their creative work? Performing 4. When is creative work ready to share? 5. How do performers select repertoire? 6.For example, read a vivid historical account or show a short video clip. Pose and explain the inquiry question. Write it on the board. Elicit students' initial ideas and ask them to share their first tentative hypothesis that answers the inquiry question. Present students with historical evidence that addresses the question. Thinking skills in history at Key Stage 1. There is nothing particularly radical about using a thinking skills approach to history at Key Stage 1, but there are certainly two main pitfalls that snare the unwary. The first lies in the area of metacognition, that part of the lesson where pupils think about HOW they have learned and not just WHAT. flats to rent north shieldsnational and/or wider world history at KS1 is to introduce children to different times and places and ways of life that they will go on to learn more about in later years. Just to study one event does not really achieve this. Here are some suggestions for other “significant events”. Which ones might you consider including at KS1? sampurna puja vidhi pdf An example of one such building is a mosque in Small Heath, Birmingham, which had formerly been the municipal swimming pool. Subject leader Stuart Boydell (see box) believes teachers often underestimate KS1 pupils' capabilities to engage with more challenging source material. Trending All sectorsFor example, the question "Should the United States have used the atomic bomb?" could be argued without any reference to historical evidence and solely on moral grounds. You want to use a question that requires that students use historical evidence to answer it. Common formats for historical questions are: causal questions: "What caused x?"Enquiries. A key cornerstone of history is historical enquiry. Quality history provision has historical enquiry at its heart. Through historical enquiry children can be shown how to ask …Figuring out what is not yet known about your topic is powerful. This gap in knowledge is a good area from which to generate research questions. Pay special attention to whether certain assumptions underpinning a conclusion should be re-examined, or whether scholars have significant disagreement about a subject.These question cards aim to prompt geographical inquiry questions in Year One students. Great for inspiring creative thinking, many of these questions are open-ended and can have a variety of responses. Twinkl Australia F - 2 Australian Curriculum Resources Humanities and Social Sciences Geography. Let this list help guide you in the right direction, or give you some ideas and inspiration! These questions range in complexity, from simple questions that can be attempted by students as young as 5 to intricate questions that involve knowledge from subjects such as biology, business, economics, chemistry, and earth sciences. bmw fault codes For example, read a vivid historical account or show a short video clip. Pose and explain the inquiry question. Write it on the board. Elicit students' initial ideas and ask them to share their first tentative hypothesis that answers the inquiry question. Present students with historical evidence that addresses the question. These question cards aim to prompt geographical inquiry questions in Year One students. Great for inspiring creative thinking, many of these questions are open-ended and can have a variety of responses. Twinkl Australia F - 2 Australian Curriculum Resources Humanities and Social Sciences Geography inquiry questions Through P4C, children naturally made comparisons and built upon their RE knowledge. Children thoroughly enjoyed the current and interactive assemblies, pitched appropriately for each Key Stage. The weekly bulletins inspire and instigate current discussions with the children which can occur in many curriculum areas. iptv xtream codes account a food worker has nausea and diarrhea the night before she is scheduled to work the opening shift throstle recreation ground middleton We believe that ‘Enquiry Based/Project Learning’ underpins the knowledge, understanding and skills of our curriculum. The idea of this learning is to reflect our desire to explore, develop & enhance our fundamental concepts in every year group, over time. The following principles formed the basis in developing our ‘Enquiry Based Learning:’.In the Columbus example, there were multiple factors inducing him to sail across the ocean blue (but, yes, obtaining cheaper pepper was one of them). This would be the "into" part or the "context" of his action. The action involved several trips back and forth across the Atlantic Ocean and some deadly and not so deadly cultural encounters.50 Examples of Deep, Meaningful History Questions History has gotten a bad rap over the years. A lot of students think it's dull and boring and filled with material that doesn't affect them. This couldn't be further from the truth! History inquiry is full of opportunities for rich, authentic learning. heavy truck frame rail blanks Students are able to draw on substantive knowledge (dates, events, people, statistics) and disciplinary knowledge (causal reasoning, analysis of change, evaluation of typicality) in dynamic harmony. If we return to the example, the students will need to know what the Battle was, who was fighting, statistics from the battlefield, and the outcome and immediate consequences (just as they would have done if you had framed the lesson around the simple ‘The Battle of Hastings’ title).This enquiry provides an overview of the Ancient Civilisations of Egypt, Sumer, Indus Valley and Shang, showing where and when they developed, the similarities between them and how they relate to a broadly based chronological understanding of the past. It provides a... Click to view The history of medicine – warts and all – for Key Stage 2 Article This resource covers the concept of HISTORICAL INQUIRY as used in several topics, including: People’s Health in Industrial Britain, c.1750-1900 Crime and Punishment in Industrial Britain, c.1750-1900 London and the Second World War, 1939-1945 Origins of the First World War William the Conqueror The First Crusade Excerpt citroen c1 radio not working You can choose to use the questions in different ways in the classroom, for example as a starter, plenary, introduction to a new topic, for consolidation at the end of a topic, or as revision. They can be used as a ten-minute activity or extended to a dedicated lesson. You can choose to work through every question or just focus on one or two.This resource covers the concept of HISTORICAL INQUIRY as used in several topics, including: People’s Health in Industrial Britain, c.1750-1900 Crime and Punishment in Industrial Britain, c.1750-1900 London and the Second World War, 1939-1945 Origins of the First World War William the Conqueror The First Crusade ExcerptKey Questions To Ask And Answer During KS2 History Units Subject: History Age range: 7-11 Resource type: Other 5 reviews File previews docx, 12.1 KB These are now …Good historians and archaeologists back their interpretations up with the evidence they have observed or collected through their investigation. Here are some questions to help you interpret your object: What does it tell us about people in the past? What does the object tell us about its owner?Aug 17, 2013 · 1) A collection of questions testing understanding of the key features of societies we have studied in this course (Babylonians, Ancient Greeks, the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Industrial Revolution and Twentieth Century). These questions are likely to be usable in almost any history department in Britain. 2) A collection of questions testing ... For example, read a vivid historical account or show a short video clip. Pose and explain the inquiry question. Write it on the board. Elicit students' initial ideas and ask them to share their first tentative hypothesis that answers the inquiry question. Present students with historical evidence that addresses the question. julia maisie ss set This process builds from KS1 to KS2 and 3, developing skills in dealing with isolated blocks of evidence and then establishing links between these, culminating in the ability to assess, ask questions of, and reflect on a large bank of potentially contradictory evidence and come to sound conclusions. Harnessing the power of objectsA historical inquiry. Students will require time for the initial design of inquiry questions and focus questions, reflection and refining. Teachers should take time to review and provide feedback on students’ questions. This will support students’ refinement of their questions. This phase can be undertaken as a combination of class time and ... life transitions funeral home chatham 1) A collection of questions testing understanding of the key features of societies we have studied in this course (Babylonians, Ancient Greeks, the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Industrial Revolution and Twentieth Century). These questions are likely to be usable in almost any history department in Britain. 2) A collection of questions testing ...One way to engage learners in this journey is to incorporate object-based enquiry. History teaching often focuses around the spoken and written word, resulting in a teacher-led …Effectively, Big Questions are essential questions that: are open-ended; have no simple "right answer" and no "yes/no" answers. are meant to be investigated, argued, looked at from different points of view. encourage active "meaning making" by the learner about important ideas. raise other important questions. cleopatra zodiac sign Within the context of open-ended mathematical tasks, it is useful to group questions into four main categories (Badham, 1994). These questions can be used be the teacher to guide the children through investigations while stimulating their mathematical thinking and gathering information about their knowledge and strategies. 1. Starter questions.Aug 17, 2013 · 1) A collection of questions testing understanding of the key features of societies we have studied in this course (Babylonians, Ancient Greeks, the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Industrial Revolution and Twentieth Century). These questions are likely to be usable in almost any history department in Britain. 2) A collection of questions testing ... This scientific enquiry KS1 resource contains a set of eight posters, each one explains an aspect of scientific enquiry and shows how researchers work scientifically to find solutions to problems or questions. Each of these posters is colour-coded, and each one contains lovely illustrations to make the poster stand out. wellcome trust phd funding 2022 An example of this may be using at the start of a topic; to elicit what the children know and get the children to formulate their own questions to research or ask one another. ... comments that the use of questioning by teachers is a very powerful tool for learning. This supports the Question Matrix, as judging by the comments and the overall ...This enquiry provides an overview of the Ancient Civilisations of Egypt, Sumer, Indus Valley and Shang, showing where and when they developed, the similarities between them and how they relate to a broadly based chronological understanding of the past. It provides a... Click to view The history of medicine - warts and all - for Key Stage 2 ArticleWhat is a 'key inquiry question' and how do you write one? This video will step you through the process and give you some examples to help you out.To learn m...Andrew Marr analyses 1860s America and the American Civil War, explaining how the conflict, and Abraham Lincoln, changed American history forever. The origins of blues and ragtime Howard Goodall... are airsoft guns legal in ontario Each unit of work has an emphasis on historical enquiry where children investigate historically framed questions whilst also developing historical enquiries ...A first step in this process is developing good inquiry questions that frame lessons and units of instruction. In this resource, we discuss the teaching and learning of history through a focus on what makes a good inquiry question. The focus here is on developing engaging and significant questions for students to investigate. An example: the Great Fire of London. Once you have the right sort of topic then you can plan the learning. What could a puzzling question be? flats to rent cannock Examples Here are some examples of focus questions from 2nd-5th grade classrooms: Where does our water come from? What effect does water have on seeds? How can we get a light bulb to burn brighter? How did the Grand Canyon form? How do the structures of crayfish help them survive? What forms does energy take? can anxiety numbness last days reddit In the final report of the Historical Association's Key Stage 2 - 3 History Project, Dr Tim Lomas asked primary pupils about what demotivated them in the way that primary history could be taught. He cited "copying, simple comprehension, filling in worksheets, instructional investigations (i.e. go and find out all you know about), simplistic ...Key Questions To Ask And Answer During KS2 History Units Subject: History Age range: 7-11 Resource type: Other 5 reviews File previews docx, 12.1 KB These are now …On this occasion, the teacher chose one good example to put in the floorbook so the class are able to use the classification key. After the lesson, the teacher added differentiated questions (one dot/two dot/three dot questions). The sticky notes are the children's responses to these questions. hawks x listener yagami yato mommy This enquiry provides an overview of the Ancient Civilisations of Egypt, Sumer, Indus Valley and Shang, showing where and when they developed, the similarities between them and how they relate to a broadly based chronological understanding of the past. It provides a... Click to view The history of medicine – warts and all – for Key Stage 2 Article55 – 57 KS1 examples linked to local contexts 58 – 63 Key Stage 2 Programme of Study ... provides the right balance between using History and Geography as the main drivers but ensuring that creative and expressive arts get a fair representation across the curriculum. They ... They should ask and answer questions, choosing and using parts of ...Other activities using objects include. Prediction activities – show pupils an object and ask them to work out which period of history it relates to.. Case study – pupils can use a single object or group of objects to build up a case study, for example, life in West Africa before the slave trade.. Groupings – pupils can group objects into sets that have particular things in common (such ... foam sheets home depot Open-ended questions like those below have no right or wrong answers, but help to broaden children’s thinking processes, to develop their speech and language skills, and to build confidence in their ability to express themselves using words. A new Big Question is posed every week in the Bosbury Telegraph!How to Create Key Inquiry Questions (History Research Process - Step 1) - YouTube 0:00 / 3:57 How to Create Key Inquiry Questions (History Research Process - Step 1) 26,330 views Jul... They might ask something like this: how did religious sentiment impact the development of the Temperance (anti-alcohol) movement in the years leading up to Prohibition? Or: were the 'flappers' of... renault trafic fault codes list Using enquiry questions. Many history departments use enquiry questions as an essential device for structuring their planning. Enquiries – built on the basis of genuine, worthwhile historical questions that the students are ultimately required to answer – often form the basic units within schemes of work, with each enquiry lasting several ...These lovely posters each feature a different question you can ask when making a scientific enquiry. For more teaching aim posters check out Learning Questions Display Poster. Or, to make your own Science display, you might like this display banner! If you want a more detailed explanation of the scientific enquiry, you can download this set of ...EYFS UTW Educational Programme Reference to KS1 History, ... They should be helped to develop their understanding of scientific ideas by using different types of scientific enquiry to answer their own questions, including observing changes over a period of time, noticing patterns, grouping and classifying things, carrying out simple comparative ... euromillions check my numbers An enquiry approach is becoming more popular for teaching many primary curriculum subjects. However, enquiry has always been the backbone of good history teaching. Knowing what constitutes a good historical enquiry and how to build one that will enable your pupils to get better at history is not as easy... Click to view.It demands an answer that is not just “Yes” or “No.”. It requires explanation and analysis. A good question leads to the understanding that its response is part of a larger conversation that’s been taking place among historians and/or the public. It leads to the desire to explain oneself, to elaborate, and to the recognition that a ...historical inquiry question examples ks1 Next, KS1 is covered, with example questions for: Human and Physical Geography Weather Patterns Classroom, School Grounds and Surrounding Environment There are lots of different questions you can ask your class during fieldwork, such as; Do we need a zebra crossing at school? daystate red wolf spare partsThese skills are sometimes referred to as a cycle or 'PLAN, DO, REVIEW'. Teachers in English primary schools may know these skills as working scientifically skills. Here we introduce seven science skills which children develop from ages 4 to 11 years: asking questions. making predictions. setting up tests. observing and measuring. recording data.Each unit of work has an emphasis on historical enquiry where children investigate historically framed questions whilst also developing historical enquiries ...Good historians and archaeologists back their interpretations up with the evidence they have observed or collected through their investigation. Here are some questions to help you interpret your object: What does it tell us about people in the past? What does the object tell us about its owner? ship24 Excerpt. Historical inquiry is a process of questioning, organising, analysing and explaining events that happened in the past. It is a cyclical process which utilises key inquiry questions. Questions focus on historical sources or evidences. Historical concepts include continuity and change, significance, cause and effect and perspectives.Feelings and Emotions. Supporting Individuals with Autism. Behaviour Support. SEND Government Information for Parents. Speech and Language Support. Social Stories. SEN Games and Resources. Support for Children with Disabilities and Additional Needs. Managing Anxiety. tomorrow gas price in toronto 13. aug. 2020 ... If we return to the example, the students will need to know what the Battle was, who was fighting, statistics from the battlefield, and the ...Great list of historical inquiry questions with examples Inquiry Based Learning Teaching Social Studies Teaching History Historical Questions Historian School Stuff Curriculum Things To Think About More information ... More information Great list of historical inquiry questions with examples More like this Teaching Social Studies ElementaryNote what happens when students ask little questions instead of big ones. Little Questions and Answers. Big Question and Answer. Q: What is your age? A: ... worcester boiler how to turn on heating Other activities using objects include. Prediction activities – show pupils an object and ask them to work out which period of history it relates to.. Case study – pupils can use a single object or group of objects to build up a case study, for example, life in West Africa before the slave trade.. Groupings – pupils can group objects into sets that have particular things in common (such ...Written by history expert Bev Forrest, this six-week series of lessons focuses on how to cover significant people in KS1 via this key question: who deserves to be remembered; Nellie Spindler or Florence Nightingale? This unit will support pupils in making connections between different time periods.Aug 17, 2013 · 1) A collection of questions testing understanding of the key features of societies we have studied in this course (Babylonians, Ancient Greeks, the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Industrial Revolution and Twentieth Century). These questions are likely to be usable in almost any history department in Britain. 2) A collection of questions testing ... Historical enquiry Sort artefacts 'then and 'now'.Distinguish between old and new. Develop vocabulary related to type of 'source' and evidence. Use questioning- why, what, who, how, where .Time line of events. Sequence collections from different periods- similarities and differences. Use a source- handle, question, observe, sketch. fanfix leaks 1) A collection of questions testing understanding of the key features of societies we have studied in this course (Babylonians, Ancient Greeks, the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Industrial Revolution and Twentieth Century). These questions are likely to be usable in almost any history department in Britain. 2) A collection of questions testing ...Oct 12, 2017 · A great inquiry-based question. addresses an authentic problem or issue. is complex and requires multiple levels of analysis. requires the use of primary / secondary sources to answer it. requires the use of historical thinking skills such as sourcing and contextualizing. lends itself to the creation of an argumentative essay or product. An example of one such building is a mosque in Small Heath, Birmingham, which had formerly been the municipal swimming pool. Subject leader Stuart Boydell (see box) believes teachers often underestimate KS1 pupils' capabilities to engage with more challenging source material. Trending All sectorsHistory Narratives and accounts of the past Primary Source Document A source of information created during or right after the event Secondary Source Document A source of information created many years after the event Sourcing When we ask who, what, why and when of a document Plausible When a fact is believable, possible or trustworthy Bias polo puffer coat More examples of students at work 1) A collection of questions testing understanding of the key features of societies we have studied in this course (Babylonians, Ancient Greeks, the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Industrial Revolution and Twentieth Century). These questions are likely to be usable in almost any history department in Britain.Key questions. Key questions are overarching questions which give any lesson or topic unity and coherence, driving and focusing the investigation. A key question for a topic might be:. The inquiry approach can be particularly useful in guiding students in navigating the myths of history. For example, in the Western Civilization curriculum I grew up with, the story went that. music bot You can choose to use the questions in different ways in the classroom, for example as a starter, plenary, introduction to a new topic, for consolidation at the end of a topic, or as revision. They can be used as a ten-minute activity or extended to a dedicated lesson. You can choose to work through every question or just focus on one or two. 14. jul. 2021 ... For example, pupils may perceive historical enquiry to be a form of ... In a 2000 article, Riley explored how enquiry questions can ...Historical enquiry Sort artefacts 'then and 'now'.Distinguish between old and new. Develop vocabulary related to type of 'source' and evidence. Use questioning- why, what, who, how, where .Time line of events. Sequence collections from different periods- similarities and differences. Use a source- handle, question, observe, sketch.Details for how to get Victoria to help your school with curriculum development are available in part 1. Part 1, on geography KS1 is here. Part 2, on geography KS2 is here. Part 3, on history KS1 is here. Key Stage 2 History. In contrast to KS1, the majority of the areas of study for KS2 are stated explicitly.Good historians and archaeologists back their interpretations up with the evidence they have observed or collected through their investigation. Here are some questions to help you interpret your object: What does it tell us about people in the past? What does the object tell us about its owner? kaleden real estate For example, read a vivid historical account or show a short video clip. Pose and explain the inquiry question. Write it on the board. Elicit students' initial ideas and ask them to share their first tentative hypothesis that answers the inquiry question. Present students with historical evidence that addresses the question. Within the context of open-ended mathematical tasks, it is useful to group questions into four main categories (Badham, 1994). These questions can be used be the teacher to guide the children through investigations while stimulating their mathematical thinking and gathering information about their knowledge and strategies. 1. Starter questions.Key Questions To Ask And Answer During KS2 History Units Subject: History Age range: 7-11 Resource type: Other 5 reviews File previews docx, 12.1 KB These are now … dried corn stalks for sale near me Inquiry-based learning focuses on the “want to know” portion of a KWL chart. However, true inquiry involves a student seeking the answers themselves, as opposed to a teacher simply providing the information through lecture and direct teaching. Here, we will examine what components make up true inquiry-based learning, as well as what flawed ...Great list of historical inquiry questions with examples Inquiry Based Learning Teaching Social Studies Teaching History Historical Questions Historian School Stuff Curriculum Things To Think About More information ... More information Great list of historical inquiry questions with examples More like this Teaching Social Studies Elementary110 Original History Essay Questions: Examples and Topics. by IvyPanda Updated on: Sep 18th, 2022. 9 min. 21,352. When looking for history essay topics, people … york u eclass Historical enquiry Sort artefacts 'then and 'now'.Distinguish between old and new. Develop vocabulary related to type of 'source' and evidence. Use questioning- why, what, who, how, where .Time line of events. Sequence collections from different periods- similarities and differences. Use a source- handle, question, observe, sketch.Figuring out what is not yet known about your topic is powerful. This gap in knowledge is a good area from which to generate research questions. Pay special attention to whether certain assumptions underpinning a conclusion should be re-examined, or whether scholars have significant disagreement about a subject.Great list of historical inquiry questions with examples Inquiry Based Learning Teaching Social Studies Teaching History Historical Questions Historian School Stuff Curriculum Things To Think About More information ... More information Great list of historical inquiry questions with examples More like this Teaching Social Studies ElementaryHistory Narratives and accounts of the past Primary Source Document A source of information created during or right after the event Secondary Source Document A source of information created many years after the event Sourcing When we ask who, what, why and when of a document Plausible When a fact is believable, possible or trustworthy Bias book blood test online nhs near me For example, someone's hypothesis could be: Constantine the Great founded the Catholic Church at the Council of Nicaea in AD 325. Your Key Inquiry Question could be: What evidence is there that Constantine the Great founded the …Good historians and archaeologists back their interpretations up with the evidence they have observed or collected through their investigation. Here are some questions to help you interpret your object: What does it tell us about people in the past? What does the object tell us about its owner?These lovely posters each feature a different question you can ask when making a scientific enquiry. For more teaching aim posters check out Learning Questions Display Poster. Or, to make your own Science display, you might like this display banner! If you want a more detailed explanation of the scientific enquiry, you can download this set of ... autism psychiatrist sydney 48 Picture Quizzes for Children aged 5 - 7. Our teachers have written these quizzes to make Year 1 and Year 2 History more enjoyable. Regular practice, especially before exams, will ensure that you come top of the class in this KS1 …1) A collection of questions testing understanding of the key features of societies we have studied in this course (Babylonians, Ancient Greeks, the Middle Ages, Renaissance, Industrial Revolution and Twentieth Century). These questions are likely to be usable in almost any history department in Britain. 2) A collection of questions testing ... tamworth road closures long eaton There are lots of examples of unanswerable questions in history lessons: 'Who was Jack the Ripper?' is a common but pointless lesson. 'Was John the worst king in English history?' would be great at the end of a breadth study of English monarchs, but again it's pointless if students have only studied the Middle Ages.Apr 27, 2014 · Learning Objectives. At the conclusion of this lesson, participants of this course will... 1. brainstorm why it is important to use primary sources and use historical inquiry. 2. explain the reasons why analysis of primary sources and historical inquiry essential skills of social studies students. 3. choose one historical central question in ... For example, someone's hypothesis could be: Constantine the Great founded the Catholic Church at the Council of Nicaea in AD 325. Your Key Inquiry Question could be: What evidence is there that Constantine the Great founded the … no deposit flats to rent merseyside A great help in my task to create a provision plan for more able and talented pupils in KS1- many thanks. Empty reply does not make any sense for the end user Submit reply CancelSosiologipäivät 2013 – Odottamattomat seuraukset/Oväntade konsekvenser 21.–22.3.2013, Turku Abstraktikooste 1 Ammatillinen koulutus ja yhteiskunnalliset ...It demands an answer that is not just “Yes” or “No.”. It requires explanation and analysis. A good question leads to the understanding that its response is part of a larger conversation that’s been taking place among historians and/or the public. It leads to the desire to explain oneself, to elaborate, and to the recognition that a ...For example, the question "Should the United States have used the atomic bomb?" could be argued without any reference to historical evidence and solely on moral grounds. You want to use a question that requires that students use historical evidence to answer it. Common formats for historical questions are: causal questions: "What caused x?" abandoned places in warrington